False albacore caught on a Slug-Go. Photos/New England Boating, Tom Richardson.

False albacore caught on a Slug-Go. Photos/New England Boating, Tom Richardson.

In the crowded world of soft-plastic lures, the Lunker City Slug-Go remains a top contender. This versatile fish fooler will take almost any species of Northeast game fish, including tuna, stripers, sea bass and scup. And I use it almost exclusively for false albacore, which can’t seem to resist the lure’s action and slim profile.

4-inch Slug-Go rigged Texas style.

4-inch Slug-Go rigged Texas style.

The Slug-Go comes in a variety of sizes, to match virtually any type of baitfish, including large herring and sand eels. As for color, I prefer pearl, bubble gum, olive and blue/white for daytime fishing, while black is my top choice at night.

Slug-Gos are effective when rigged on leadhead jigs to get them deep or increase casting distance. Hopping them over the bottom in a rip is a good way to score with fluke and stripers, or you can cast a weighted Slug around rock piles, pilings and other structure. However, my favorite way to fish them is Texas-style on a worm hook. This weedless, weightless method is great for tempting stripers and the aforementioned albies, and can be the only way to score in weedy conditions.

6-inch Slug-Go rigged on a leadhead.

6-inch Slug-Go rigged on a leadhead.

When targeting stripers, I prefer a 6” to 9” Slug-Go, which I twitch slowly on or just below the surface. For albies, I use a 4-inch model in pearl or bubble gum, and retrieve it at a medium speed through the school of breaking fish.

To watch a video on rigging a Slug-Go Texas-style, CLICK HERE.

To watch a video on rigging a Slug-Go on a leadhead jig, CLICK HERE.

A large Slug-Go rigged on a leadhead.

A large Slug-Go rigged on a leadhead.

 

 

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