Zebra mussel on native mussel. The zebra mussel was inadvertently introduced to the United States and is now spreading rapidly, impacting native fish species, as well as clogging power plant intakes. Boaters, anglers, and waterfowl hunters can help prevent further spread of zebra mussels. Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Zebra mussel on native mussel. The zebra mussel was inadvertently introduced to the United States and is now spreading rapidly, impacting native fish species, as well as clogging power plant intakes. Boaters, anglers, and waterfowl hunters can help prevent further spread of zebra mussels. Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The New York Times reports on research by Daniel P. Molloy, an emeritus biologist at the New York State Museum in Albany, whose team at the museum’s Cambridge Field Research Laboratory in upstate New York has discovered a bacterium that kills invasive zebra mussels but appears to have little or no effect on other aquatic organisms.

Since then, Marrone Bio Innovations has developed a commercial formulation of the bacterium called Zequanox. According to the Times article, Zequanox killed more than 90% of the zebra mussels in a test using tanks of water from Lake Carlos in Minnesota, while a control group of freshwater mussels were unharmed.

Read more about the promising new method of controlling zebra mussels.

 

 

 

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