Deep-sea animals, such as starfish, characterize life under the ice shelf. Photo: Julian Gutt & Werner Dimmler, Alfred-Wegener-Institut/MARUM, Universität Bremen

Deep-sea animals, such as starfish, characterize life under the ice shelf. Photo: Julian Gutt & Werner Dimmler, Alfred-Wegener-Institut/MARUM, Universität Bremen

Larva of a Herring: Fish larvae are sensitive to ocean acidification. Photo: G. Lauckner, Alfred Wegener Institute

Larva of a Herring: Fish larvae are sensitive to ocean acidification. Photo: G. Lauckner, Alfred Wegener Institute

CapeCodOnline: Rising levels of carbon dioxide are harming all forms of marine life because the oceans are acidifying as they absorb the gas, German researchers found.

Mollusks, corals and a class of creatures called echinoderms that includes starfish and sea urchins are the worst affected by the uptake of CO2 by the seas, according to a study Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change by researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven.

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For the press release from the Alfred Wegener Institute, CLICK HERE.

 

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