Volunteers Protect Rare Plovers and Terns

Piping Plovers lay their eggs directly on the ground just above the mean high water on Long Island Sound Beaches. Photo courtesy Audubon Connecticut/AJ Hand.
Piping Plovers lay their eggs directly on the ground just above the mean high water on Long Island Sound Beaches. Photo courtesy Audubon Connecticut/AJ Hand.

A recent article on TheDay.com profiles some of the volunteers who monitor Connecticut’s piping plover and least tern nesting areas.

Photo/Wikimedia

Both shorebirds are on the federal and state list of threatened species.

About 60 volunteers have been recruited and trained through a cooperative effort of the state’s two Audubon organizations, the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Throughout the season, the volunteers report any repairs needed to the wire fencing, “keep away” signs and check the nests — which are protected within circular wire cages with spaces large enough for the plovers to pass through, but small enough to keep predators out. They also keep track of the numbers of eggs, chicks and adults they see each time, reporting the numbers to a central database. They answer questions from the public about the birds, and sometimes have to remind walkers or boaters pulling motor boats and kayaks onto the beach to stay behind the wire fencing and keep their dogs off beaches with nesting birds.

To read more:

The Day

 

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